Posted 7 months ago

Rebuilt a Rebcor R1 helmet. New paint. Re-lined. Added the snaps for a Biltwell bubble shield

Posted 10 months ago
Posted 10 months ago

Pipes wrapped and back on.

Posted 11 months ago

Out of the garage

Posted 1 year ago

Lowered the front end about 2.5” and installed the clip ons

Posted 1 year ago

Finally got around to building the new seat.  Check out my blog for details on the build.

Posted 1 year ago

The Finished Product

Posted 1 year ago

Once I sewed the side and top panels together, I needed to figure out a way to affix the seat cover to the seat.  I decided to use a lacing system, because this would allow me to easily change the seat cover in the future if I needed to, and reduced the number of holes I would need to drill into the seat pan.  I placed a number of eye rivets along the edges of the seat cover and laced her up.  Once I reattached the spacers she was ready to go.

Posted 1 year ago

The next step was to cut out and set in place the seat padding.  I just happened to have some left over high-density carpet padding in the garage, so I used it as the base of the seat pad.  I cut out the padding to the shape of the seat pan and affixed it using double sided carpet tape.  I also topped the pad off with ½” low density foam to help add to the pillowed texture of the seat cover.

Posted 1 year ago

To create the pattern for the seat cover, I mocked up the top and side panels using poster board.  This allowed me to try a few different patterns until I came up with a design that I liked.  Once I achieved the desired look, I use the poster board panels as a guide to cutting out the vinyl panels.

Posted 1 year ago

For the fabric, I picked up some brown vinyl and some cloth-backed padding (1/8”).  I wanted to give the seat a pillowed look so I sewed the padding to the vinyl (cloth side down) with a few horizontal stitches about an inch and a half apart.

Posted 1 year ago

To attach the seat pan to the frame, I decided to use bimini curtain spacers.  These are used on the bimini’s of boats to keep the curtains from rubbing up against the metal. They can be purchased on eBay.  They snap right on around the frame tubing, and made for a super convenient way to attach the seat pan.  I drilled holes in each of the spacers and counter sunk the screws so the would not scratch the frame. 

Posted 1 year ago

The next step involved bending the seat pan to contour to the tail end of the bike. I put a carboard spacer in place to ensure enough of a gap so that the seat cover would have enough clearance.  I heated the rear end of the seat pan using a heat gun (such as the kind used for removing paint).  This process took about an hour to complete.  I would heat one side, flip it over and heat the other side. I went back and forth like this until the plastic became somewhat pliable.  I then put the seat pan in place on bike and continued to heat it and while applying some force to bend it into the proper shape.  Once I had the bend the way I liked it, I let it cool for a few hours and then trimmed off the excess.

Posted 1 year ago

I decided to make the seat pan out of HDPE plastic.  It is light weight and moldable when heated to high temperatures.  I purchased a 24 X 12 X 3/8 in sheet from granger.com for less $20.00.  The first step was to measure the frame of the bike and cut out the appropriate size pan.

Posted 1 year ago

Seat Construction

I finally got around to building the new seat.  It came out a lot better than I expected, so I thought I would go ahead and post the process for anyone who was interested.